MAYDAY CRITERIA

To help the INCIDENT COMMANDER direct and manage the incident in the event a MAYDAY is transmitted from an interior company, a checklist has been developed to ensure that all tasked are being covered. The checklist is outlined below. It is an excellent template from which the incident commander can base their operations during an extremely stressful situation.

• Request emergency traffic.
• (LUNAR-location, unit, name or number, assignment and resources needed).
• Deploy rescue sector.
• Request additional alarms (x two).
• Change plan to offensive/defensive strategy-rescue mode.
• Assign additional companies to rescue sector.
• Obtain Personnel Accountability Reports (PAR) on all crews, including their location.
• Reinforce firefighting positions. Utilize large handlines (2.5 inches).
• Assign chief officer to the rescue sector.
• Assign second chief to rescue branch. Move to channel two or three.
• Maintain radio and crew discipline.
• Open all doors and windows.
• Ventilate and maintain tenability; provide lighting (TED).
• Assign safety sector.
• Assess structural stability (safety sector/branch).
• Expand rehabilitation sector (air utility near rescue entry).
• Establish treatment and transportation sectors (request ambulances).
• Assign chief officer to medical sector/branch.
• Assess technical rescue requirements.

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Minimal Bullets

I developed this Program originally for the iPod and since for this website to meet the requirements of the OSHA LAWS & NFPA Standards and created TEMPLATES for questions to teach as many of the laws and standards necessary to hit all the points on the NJDOP oral examination for promotion within your fire department within the State of NJ.

The Magic Formula is to WORK Hard & Smart. The Homework and Reference links are sorted out and organized (FORMATTED) but  the work must be put in Learning to FORMAT & DELIVER your Response Orally.

I use iTunes to organize my information which is always on while driving in my car. I call it my 24 hour tutor. I update my material to keep up with the most up to date standards and reference material available an I make sure that every template is accurate so the repetition is on point and effective and I learn the correct response like a song.

 

Scenario #1- Question #1. (Size Up)
What FACTORS must you consider when fighting this fire.
COALWASWEALTH

1. WIND SPEED AND DIRECTION
2. BUILDING CONSTRUCTION
3. WATER SUPPLY
4. FIRE SPREAD TO EXPOSURES
5. ATTIC CHEMICALS
6. APPARATUS PLACEMENT
7. POSSIBLE LIFE HAZARDS IN EXPOSURES
8. LOCATION AND EXTENT OF FIRE

Scenario #1- Question #2. (IMS)
What ACTIONS would you take.

1. ESTABLISH COMMAND 
2. ESTABLISH WATER SUPPLY
3. STRETCH HOSE VIA INTERIOR TO ATTIC
4. REQUEST HAZMAT
5. REQUEST ADDITIONAL ALARMS
6. EVACUATE EXPOSURES
7. PRIMARY SEARCH AND RESCUE
8. VENT THE ROOF
9. REQUEST EMS
10. STRETCH BACK UP HOSE LINE
11. PROVIDE SECONDARY EGRESS
12. FULL PPE
13. REPORT SIZE UP
14. SAFETY OFFICER
15. RIC

Scenario #2- Question #1. Steps to implement School Fire Prevention Program.

1. MEET with selected firefighters.
2. GET INPUT
3. CONDUCT TRAINING for firefighters
4. MEET with school LIAZON to discuss program
5. Submit PROGRESS REPORT to BC
6. Set GOALS & OBJECTIVES
7. SCHEDULE MEETING to EVALUATE PROGRESS
8. OUTLINE EXPECTATIONS of firefighters
9. SUBMIT Press Release.

Scenario #2- Question #2. Subordinate Progressive Discipline.

1. PULL RECORDS (Fact Finding Mission)
2. MEET WITH EACH FF SEPARATELY
3. MEET WITH MS JONES AND MS PHILIPS SEPARATELY
4. CONDUCT A THOROUGH INVESTIGATION
5. DOCUMENT INVESTIGATION
6. PREPARE A WRITTEN REPORT TO CHIEF
7. PROVIDE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE ACTIONS

Scenario #3- Question #1. What are your INITIAL ACTIONS.

1.  ROLLING SIZE UP
2.  ESTABLISH COMMAND
3.  SECURE A WATER SUPPLY
4.  STRETCH A HOSE LINE
5.  SSR– TO DISPATCH
6.  PRIMARY SEARCH AND RESCUE
7.  STRETCH A BACK UP HOSE LINE.
8.  ADDITIONAL RESOURCES (2UPERSWAR)
9.  LIPC-RECEO VS
10. LOVERSLUMMEERS

Scenario #3- Question #2. EVOLVING INCIDENT
FLASHOVER occurs, What are your ACTIONS?

1. CALL/ACTIVATE ADDITIONAL ALARMS
2. PROGRESS REPORTS
3. CONDUCT PAR
4. STRETCH ADDITIONAL HOSE LINES
5. CHECK FOR EXTENTION
6. STRETCH EXPOSURE LINES FOR DOWNWIND STRUCTURES.
7. SECURE SECONDARY WATER SUPPLY
8. TRANSMIT PROGRESS REPORTS

Scenario #3- Question #3. Subordinate SOP Training
FF makes several mistakes. When returning to the firehouse how do you handle this situation?

1. CLARIFY
2. REVIEW
3. INSTRUCT
4. ADVISE BC
5. MONITOR
6. POINT OUT MISTAKES
7. SCHEDULE TRAINING AND DRILLS
8. CRITIQUE
9. DOCUMENT
10. POINT OUT POSSITIVES
11. KEEP BC INFORMED.

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TOPPLED

They were struck by a mass of brick and mortar.

Leo Ross
William B Crane
Jacob Bleyhle

A Wall was toppled over by the explosion as 19  Newark firefighters were caught in the collapse while fighting the blaze from a lower building.

3 were killed and 16 were injured by falling wall at the  fire on Mechanic Street at about 5:00 A.M. April 23, 1904.

The dead were Jacob Bleyhle of Truck Company No. 3 , William P. Crane of Engine Company No. 3 and Leo Ross of Truck Co. No. 3 would die the following day.

Just what caused the fire was not known but it started in the 4th floor of the five story brick building at 89 mechanic Street adjoining it on the West Side was a one story brick structure. The big building was occupied by Wiener Company. The one story structure was occupied by empire Gear and Top Company.  As soon as the firemen arrived, about 25 of them with hand lines imposed on the smaller building.  They were there only five minutes when an explosion occurred in the latter building throwing out the West wall on the firemen.

It was said that a can of benzene caused the explosion. One of the members of the firm, however, denied the benzene was used in the factory.  The men saw the wall falling on them but it came down so quickly that none of them could move to escape.

They ran for the lives.  

A cry of terror from the crowd of people in the streets warned Chief Kiersted and Battalion Chief Morgan and a number of firemen in the street in front of the building of their danger and they ran for their lives.  The fall of walls however crushed the other fireman through the roof to the floor below the smaller structure.

The screams of agony caused all the firemen and policemen in the street to rush to their aid, and as the victims were carried out they were placed in the patrol wagons and rushed to hospitals.  Before the ambulance which carried fireman Bleyhle had gone a block away it was found that the man was dead and the body was taken to the morgue.  There it was found that almost every bone his body was broken fireman Crane died about an hour after he had been taken to St. Michael’s Hospital.

Injury to Chief Kiersted.

Chief Kiersted had his right foot injured by falling over a box while trying to escape the falling walls.  Battalion Chief Morgan had his left ankle and side injured.  Portions of the front wall of the buildings struck him.

A Miraculous escape.

That all of these men were not killed was considered miraculous Chief Engineer Kiersted had said afterwards I did not expect to see one man who was on that roof, taken from that pile of bricks alive. I am glad that we did not lose more of our brave men then we did, as we cannot spare them.  Firemen Jacob Bleyhle, William P. Crane and Leo Ross are among the best men in the department.

Who discovered the fire in question. Apparently a number knew of it at the same time, among them was engineer of central roads. All with the echoes in the morning hearing the shriek of whistles…

At 8:48:00 the fire alarm was turned in for a box 323 .

Chief Engineer Kiersted arrived at the fire soon after the first alarm sounded and had each of the first due engines run out two lines of hose than the blaze was hit from all sides.

The Hosewagon of Engine Company No. 1 on which the recently purchased a pair in also was placed was stationed at the front of the building and several lines of hose were attached to it with good results.

As the wall fell the two horses attached to the South scored twice broke away and jumped right upon No. 1 hose wagon a few feet away.  As soon as possible the horses were taken off the wagon and was found that they were not seriously hurt.

The chief leads the way.

Before the noise of fallen wall had died away Chief Engineer Kiersted ‘s command to all the fireman near him to rescue the men under the pile of bricks, and unmindful of others who responded to the chiefs call for help. There were cops as well as firemen.

In a few minutes the bricks were being removed at a great rate and the timber was being hauled to the side.  In the meantime a call had been sent to Police Headquarters. It sent all the ambulances in the city to the fire scene and when they arrived the injured firemen were tenderly lifted into them and taken to St. Barnabas and St. Michael’s Hospitals.  As there were not enough ambulances to carry all the men away, vehicles of all kinds were pressed into service, and in 15 minutes after the wall had fallen, every one of the men had been taken from the scene of the conflagration.

Fire Commissioner Burke arrived on the scene shortly after the last man was taken away. And he was greatly distressed when he learned of the terrible accident. While firemen were at work rescuing the injured men, a number of electric light and telephone wires fell upon the rescuers, but none of them was injured as the rubber coats and boots save them.

One of the most troubling scenes at the fire after the injured men had been taken away was a pile of the fire hats that had been worn by the firemen.  Had been placed in a heep on the sidewalk nearby.  There were eight hats altogether but they were almost crushed flat giving evidence of the awful force of the fall of the bricks.  It was realized that if it had not been for the stiffness of the leather hats many of those men would have had their skulls crushed.

Despite the general feelings of distress and sympathetic meant manifested by the spectators there were some wretched souvenir hunters who stole the number plates off the helmets and later three of the hats were carried away.  It would not have been well for these relic hungry thieves to have been caught by the firemen that were working that day, as they were greatly angered when they learned that their hats worn by their stricken comrades had been stolen.

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Saddest Day

saddy

Rolling Size up

Preparing for a deadly career is a serious challenge and I took an artistic approach to teaching myself how to stay alive in 1992. I went back to school and used the Newark Fire Department as my muse. It started out a Documentary "The Life of a Newark Firefighter". I would frequent the Newark Library’s NJ room and make copies old news papers from microfilm and do research on NFD LODD’s.  The Star Ledger Printed this article about the tragedy…

NEWARK’S SADDEST DAY… MAY 7TH 1972

3 Newark firemen died late last night after they had been pulled, mortally injured, from the collapse of a burning two-story building assertedly torched by teenagers. Three other firemen were injured and one managed to crawl to safety.

dom
Captain Dominick LaTorre

Engine 12

badge #246, served in the U.S. Navy. He was appointed on 1/1/1952, On 9/2/1967,  promoted to Captain of Engine 12. He was 44 years old at the time of his death. Captain LaTorre was promoted posthumously to Battalion Chief.

russ
Fireman Russell Schoemer

Truck 5

Badge #315, served in the U.S. Army. He was appointed on 11/6/1967.  He was 31 years old at the time of his death.

vic
Captain Anthony V. Lardiere

Truck 4

badge #402, served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He was appointed on 7/1/1948 promoted to Captain 4/9/1963 and was assigned to Truck 4. He was 54 years old at the time of his death.

STATION 2317

The dead were three;

Capt. Anthony V. Lardiere of a Truck Company No. 4; Capt. Dominick N. LaTorre</strong> , of Engine Co. 12 and FireFighter Russell Schoemer of a Truck Company No. 5. Lardiere and Schoemer died at Martland Hospital. LaTorre at St. James just before midnight.
Moments earlier, Fire Chief John Grehl emerged to announce it to the soot covered firefighters and some off-duty fireman crowding the halls, from the highest elected on down the ranks were informed that their brothers had died.

The seven were trapped when the building, with an empty Tavern on the ground floor, collapsed in a fiery roar after a third alarm had sounded at 9:46 p.m. Most of the injured were rushed to Martland Hospital. only LaTorre to St. James. The men were buried for up to two hours before their mates had dug them out with picks, shovels and their bare hands.

Next Steps...

John Caufield Called it the saddest day in the history of the Newark fire Department. It had the highest one day toll in the cities history. Firemen who witnessed it said the walls gave way “without warning”.

According to the other firefighters, seven firemen- 6 who were hospitalized, three died, had gone into the building with a heavy-duty hose. It came down just like that a rain-soaked firemen recall. The 7th fireman Robert Wiggins, was not down and just stood up dumbfounded he said Wiggins his face and raincoat covered with dirt and rubble, started working to pull his fellow firefighters from the pile of timber which cover them.

On the verge of tears at one point Wiggins turn to another fireman and asked “How could it happen? How could it happen?

Off-Duty fireman, policemen and rescue squad members rushed to the fire scene, where the visibility was often limited by the smoke from the fire which continued to burn and the driving rain.

Fire officials and spokesmen from Martland Hospital. could not recall the order in which the firemen were removed and taken to the hospital. But the first trapped fireman was dragged to safety shortly before 10:40 p.m.

He was placed on a stretcher carried gingerly to a waiting ambulance and then taken to Martland Hospital..

Each succeeding rescue followed the same procedure. The last man Capt. Domenic LaTorre of Engine Company 12 was removed from the rubble and taken to St. James Hospital at about 11:20 p.m.

Caulfield , drenched with the cold rain left for the hospital. He was taken to Martland Hospital.. “it looks bad.” he said ” Real Bad, It looks like we lost three.”
They shouldn’t have gone in Caulfield said in route to his car. But that’s the way they fight fires. He paused to look at the abandoned car from which flames continued to flicker and said without bitterness. “This block has been burning down from one end to the other.” The area he said was a trouble spot. Fire hydrants had been vandalized. Firemen were constantly being harassed and fires were set. A growing epidemic.

Newark police later announced the arrest of 213 year-old youths on arson charges at the scene of the burning frame structure at Orchard and Pennington Streets.

According to detectives , they arrested both youths at the scene of the fire at 11:00 p.m. John Aquino, Fire Department community relations officer, said the interigation took place after he acted as an interpreter for Spanish-speaking and English-speaking youths.

“The deaths were frustrating and sad and could have been avoided if the city had proper priorities in spending its money.” The headlines Hammered on May 10th 1972.

“Junky Havens” were blamed in the tragedy. A West to ward councilman strongly reacted following the deaths of the firemen.
He said the city must set priorities on its projects and a major project must be to rid our city of these deathtraps and “Junky Havens”.

The councilman said that we can not ignore this priority which is costing human lives. He called on the administration to concentrate on one project and get it done rather than working on piecemeal of a hundred projects and never getting anything finished. The city had been wasting money on a number of projects throughout the city while rat infested abandend buildings stand tall in Newark.

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Fireman John Curran

Fireman John Curran was killed on November 22nd 1929 thrown from the fire truck and  crushed  between the rig and a parked auto. At 16:19 hours, Truck 3 answered an alarm from Box 234, at William and Shipman Streets. At West Market and Norfolk Streets, the driver swung the truck out to pass an auto and the tiller wheels got locked in the trolley tracks. When the wheels were finally released, it caused the tiller to swing wildly to the left and strike a parked car.

Fireman; Curran, 49, who was riding the left running board, was crushed between the truck and the car and then thrown from the rig. The car was then pushed forward by the force of the impact and struck a pedestrian. Badly cut about the body, Curran was placed in a passing auto and rushed to the hospital, where the 27-year veteran died about an hour later as the result of a punctured lung and other internal injuries. The alarm he was responding to was pulled for a fire in the Washington Upholstery Co., at 73 Shipman Street. The $500 blaze was caused by an overheated motor.

The accident was caused witnesses said, by the rear wheels of the long hook and ladder truck catching in the trolley tracks when the driver swung out to to pass an automobile.  When the rear wheels were released, the truck swung sharply to the left.  Curran was  riding on the left side of the vehicle was crushed when the apparatus struck the parked car on his side.  His body was badly cut and his lung was punctured.

Curran who was temporarily assigned to truck No. 3 was in route to a call at 4:19 from box 234 at William and Shipman Streets.  Curran was taken to hospital in a passing automobile and died within an hour from internal injuries commissioner Murray was at his bedside.

“The fire was in the Washington Upholstery Co. plant at 73 Shipment Street.  The blaze did damage estimated at $500 it was caused by an overheated motor” police said.

Curran was born October 14th 1880 and appointed to the fire department June 16th,1902.  Chief Towey stated  this morning. ” The Newark Fire Department had lost one of the finest type of men.  Fireman John Curran’s work was always of the finest order.”  He served the Newark Fire Department for 27 years.

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Marcus A. Reddick

Marcus A. Reddick On New Years Eve 1985 A firefighter who fell 35 feet and cushioned the fall of a woman he was trying to rescue from a third-floor apartment remained in critical condition for 2 days.
Firefighter Marcus Reddick was treated at University Hospital for head, neck, back and chest injuries. He died January 2nd, 1986.

The fire started Tuesday night in a three-story frame structure, said fire director John Caufield. After spotting Mrs. Ubeda waving and screaming from her window, Reddick climbed a 35-foot ladder to try to rescue her, Caufield said.

Another firefighter, Andy Marcell, climbed behind Reddick and grabbed his legs to secure him, but as Mrs. Ubeda reached for Reddick, they lost their balance and fell to the ground.

The apartment resident, Angela Ubeda, improved from serious to stable condition, Mrs. Ubeda, 67, fell atop Reddick and suffered only from smoke inhalation and she made a full recovery.

Helmets Hung Above the Streets

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4 STEP IMS (ROLLING SIZE UP)

QUESTION #1. What will be your report to dispatch and other arriving units?

USING FOUR STEPS TO ESTABLISH COMMAND according to IMS (Incident Management System)

  • STEP # ONE:    GIVE A ROLLING SIZE UP – 
  • STEP # TWO:   ESTABLISH COMMAND  
  • STEP # THREE:  MAKE AN INCIDENT ACTION PLAN 
  • STEP # FOUR:  COMMUNICATE STRATEGIES TASKS & TACTICS

I WILL ESTABLISH COMMAND USING  THE SOP’S & IMS TO ENSURE ORGANIZATION, SAFETY & ACCOUNTABILITY (PAR) AT THIS INCIDENT. All members donning PROPER (PPE) and will adhere to a riding list and tagging system

Continue reading
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PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT

I USED THE STUDY GUIDES  THE NFPA STANDARDS  TO DEVELOP MY MANAGEMENT TEMPLATE

Question #1.  As a newly Promoted BC, How do you address this situation?

The Chief orders you to investigate the quality of station training in the Department, beginning with Battalion 6, and to compare it to the quality of training with that of the other five fire Battalions in the department.

Battalion 6 has the worst reputation for consistent training and I will set in place a Training Regiment that will Fix this Problem.

1st I must understand That my Job as BC6, AS IS EVERY BC &amp; EVERY OTHER MEMBER OF THE FD. are all Under the DIRECTION of the Fire Chief AND THESE ARE HIS REQUESTS OF ME.

Incident and FD PRIORITIES are always … L.I.P.C.

I recognize that THE LIFE SAFETY OF THE FIREFIGHTERS &amp; CIVILIANS IS PARAMOUNT and Proper Training is key to keeping  everyone safe on the SCENE and SAFETY is regarded as the single most important reason to train.

<span style=”color: #0000ff;”>My Job assists in the MANAGEMENT, TRAINING and DISCIPLINE of my subordinates on the fire department by supervising a group of fire companies engaged in providing fire Protection for people and property.</span>

MANAGEMENT

*  I WILL APPLY BASIC MANAGEMENT &amp; TRAINING ACTIVITIES INVOLVING
1. PLANNING, 2. STRUCTURE, 3. DIRECTION

*  I WILL IMPLEMENT PROGRAMS &amp;  EVALUATE PERIODICALLY TO ENSURE THEY CONTINUALLY MAKE PROGRESS. I WILL BENCHMARK  &amp; ACHIEVE SET GOALS.

5 ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL TRAINING PROCESS.

1. PLANNING   ( Both Management &amp; Training )
2. ENSURING SAFETY
3. MEETING NATIONAL, STATE  AND LOCAL TRAINING STANDARDS AND REQUIREMENTS
4. RECOGNIZING NEEDS (TRAINING IN CONTEXT &amp; DISCIPLINE)
5. FORMAT DELIVERY TO SUIT YOUR “NEEDS ANALYSIS”

I WILL USE THE 5 ELEMENTS &amp; A DISAPLINED APPROACH &amp; DIRECT MY PLANS AND PROGAMS. AS FOLLOWS:

<strong>1. PLANNING IS KEY IN BOTH MANAGEMENT &amp; TRAINING:</strong>
<strong> SO ALWAYS 1ST – FACT FINDING / “NEEDS ANALYSIS”</strong>

ID THE CHALLENGE, PULL ALL PREVIOUS TRAINING RECORDS, NIFR’s and Injury Reports.

Get I.S.O RATING &amp; SET GOALS IN WRITING!

Scenario Specific:
<span style=”color: #0000ff;”>INVESTIGATE</span> the quality of station training in the Department, beginning with Station 6, and to compare it to the quality of training  with that of the other five fire Battalions in the department, as well as other cities and States.

I will set in place a Training Regiment that will
<span style=”color: #0000ff;”>ROLE MODEL THE SUCCESSFUL PROGRAMS.</span>
<span style=”color: #0000ff;”> LOOK INTO COST SHARING WITH THE OTHER CITIES AND TOWNS</span>
<span style=”color: #0000ff;”> MEET ALL CHALLENGES.</span>

I WILL ALSO NEED TO GRADE OUR Fire Department. ,
Get and Improve  THE I.S.O Rating?

Pre Fire Plans and Post Incident Evaluation AKA /Post Fire Analisys combined with Daily TRAINING SCHEDULE which use the S.O.P. as a Safety Model and the IMS to keep structure and ACCOUNTABILITY in place.

I will start with me …

I WILL DEVISE A DAILY SCHEDULE AND BE INVOLVED WITH THE DAILY DRILLS
The most important aspect of my Job will be to train and drill my battalion to see where they are at and me being new to the post will need to do research to bring myself up to speed as well.

ANNUAL TARGET HAZARD REPORTS  UPDATED PRE FIRE PLANS WILL BE REVIEWED BY ME AS WELL AS  MY SUBORDINATES.

2.  Ensuring Safety
I will MEET WITH OTHER BC’s. ADDRESS ALL SAFETY ISSUES AND SOP’S &amp; set goals to fix INHERENT problems. Always FOCUS on a possitive.

SET Chief’s AT EASE meeting is to address training concerns brought up by the chief of the department AND EXPLAIN HOW THIS SAFETY PROGRAM WILL BENEFIT  EVERYONE.

Scenario Specific: …
EXPLAIN YOUR ASSIGNMENT is to develop a plan for evaluating the consistency and quality of station training throughout the department, starting with Station 6. I WOULD LIKE TO START WITH A MODEL OF WHAT IS GOING ON IN THE OTHER 5 BATTALIONS OTHER CITIES AND STATES.

I propose to bring in the other battalion chiefs AND FORM A SAFETY COMMITTEE so that EVERYONE CAN BE BETTER TRAINED AND PREPARED. With Battalion Chief’ I STRESS Team Work and LEADING BY EXAMPLE.

CONVEY THE FACT THAT THE FIRE CHIEF HAS ASKED ME TO HEAD THIS PROJECT AND THANK THEM FOR THEIR HELP. I WILL SERVE AS THE LIAISON OFFICER BETWEEN THE
HEAD OF THE SAFETY COMMITTEE, BC’s, THE TRAINING OFFICER AND OTHER
STAFF POSITIONS such as Planning, LOGISTICS and community relations.

STRESSING “BACK TO THE BASICS”…
I will USE ALL available RESOURCES at my disposal.
THE INTERNET AND THE NATIONAL FIRE ACADEMY CAN TRAIN FROM A DISTANCE . THE WWW IS AN INVALUABLE POOL OF KNOWLEDGE  &amp; TOOL  FOR TRAINING THAT I CAN AND DO USE. I would like to role MODEL successful programs starting with the basics.

PAUSE AND LISTEN TO SUGGESTIONS?

3.   MEET NATIONAL, STATE  AND LOCAL TRAINING STANDARDS AND REQUIREMENTS DEVELOP SOLUTIONS BASED ON YOUR…..NEEDS ASSESSMENT, STRATEGIC NEEDS &amp; ORGANIZATIONAL GOALS.
TRAIN TRAIN &amp; TRAIN SOME MORE!!!
ALL OF OUR MEMBERS

WRITTEN COMMUNICATION OF ALL PROGRESS. RECORD KEEPING IS A HUGE SOURCE OF INFORMATION,
PRE FIRE PLANNING AND POST INCIDENT EVALUATION (PIE’S) WILL USED AS TRAINING TOOLS AS WELL AS “TRAINING IN CONTEXT.”

Fire departments nationwide will develop the next generation of successful and effective fire officers by following the requirements in NFPA 1021

4. RECOGNIZING NEEDS … MANAGEMENT, TRAINING and DISCIPLINE
REVIEW SOP (GET Back to the BASICS,  L.I.P.C….I.M.S., S.O.G., PRE FIRE PLANS, &amp; Accountability , TRAINING IN CONTEXT &amp; PIE’S)

Training in context uses the available time and resources within my battalion during OUR work schedule.

This process takes as many elements of the training standard as possible and incorporates it into solutions for tactical problems that arise on the fire ground.

MY NEEDS ANALYSIS WILL focus on:
* critical skills and knowledge that are used infrequently.
* HIGH CONSEQUENCE SKILLS AND PROCEDURES
* INPUT FROM INCIDENT EXPERIENCE
* CONTINUING EDUCATION REQUIRED FOR CERTIFICATION.
* MANDATED TRAINING
* DEPARTMENTAL GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

Training in Context consists of 4 steps.
1. The Operation Explained
2. The Expected Product is Illustrated.
3. The candidates are coached while they practice. Using Repetition to master technical skills
4. The perfect Product is evaluated.

5.  FORMAT DELIVERY TO SUIT YOUR “NEEDS ANALYSIS.”
A.D.I.M.E.(ANALYZE, Develop, I.D. CHALLENGES and Implement SOLUTIONS, Monitor &amp; Evaluate Progress)

MY PRESENTATION TO THE CHIEF WILL INCLUDE ….
*   IDENTIFY THAT this is an ON GOING CHALLENGE. PULL ALL TRAINING RECORDS, REVIEW AND SET GOALS
* IDENTIFY: RESEARCH WHAT RULES, REGULATIONS, LAWS, AND STANDARDS MAY APPLY TO MY PLAN.THERE ARE SOME EXCELLENT MODELS TO CHOOSE FROM AND ADOPT.

* STRESSING “BACK TO THE BASICS”…

I WILL IDENTIFY TRAINING WITHIN 3 CATEGORIES
THE MUST KNOW, THE NEED TO KNOW AND THE NICE TO KNOW.

THE MUST KNOW… “OSHA”
1. HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE TRAINING(HAZWOPER)
2. RESPIRATORY PROTECTION TRAINING
3. OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE TO BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS

THE NEED TO KNOW…CERTIFICATION BASED TRAINING …”NFPA”
NFPA 1000 STANDARD ON FIRE SERVICE PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATION
ACCREDITATION AND CERTIFICATION SYSTEMS.
NFPA 1001, 1002….
NFPA 472 STANDARD FOR RESPONSE TO HAZMAT MATERIAL INCIDENTS

THE NICE TO KNOW…?

ANYTHING NOT MANDATORY BUT CAN AID IN INCIDENT STABILIZATION.

* DEVELOP SET UP TRAINING OPERATIONS AT ALL LEVELS (ITCO)
Mandates Captains to be certified Trainers of Firefighters.
Firefighters should be constantly collecting knowledge and Data to keep themselves current on all changes

INSTRUCTIONAL TRAINING FOR COMPANY OFFICERS ( ITCO )
USING NFPA STANDARDS 1021 AND 1041.

NFPA 1021 helps ensure fire officers are ready to take command in today’s world.
IT HELPS fire service leaders PREPARE FOR multiple challenges on the fire ground, at the station, and in the community.

NFPA 1021: Standard for Fire Officer Professional Qualifications identifies the performance requirements necessary for the duties of a fire officer and specifically identifies four levels of progression: Fire Officer Levels I, II, III, and IV.
Changes in the 2009 edition include:
• A rewritten and updated document purpose and scope
• A new skills maintenance requirement in Chapter 1
• Replacement of the term “certification” with the term “qualification”
• Revised duty statements for inspection and investigation (Chapters 4, 5, and 6)
• New Job Performance Requirements (JPRs) clarify the committee’s intent

Scenario Specific:
PRE FIRE PLANS, TARGET HAZARDS &amp; EXCEPTION PRINCIPLES
Station 6’s district includes two elementary schools, the high school, numerous strip malls and two shopping centers. The rest of the district consists of middle-to-upper- class, single-family dwellings. Review S.O.P.’s &amp; PRE PLANS. BRING ALL UP TO DATE…IDENTIFY TARGET HAZARDS AND DISCUSS FINDINGS DURING DRILLS.

DISCIPLINE AND THE CHAIN OF COMMAND

* OPEN DOOR POLICY for questions and advice to all COMMAND STAFF, CAPTAINS and FIREFIGHTERS.

* DOCUMENT any … meetings / training / investigations

DIRECT &amp; DOCUMENT

*  FOLLOW UP and hold Captains &amp; Firefighters accountable for Training and IMPROVEMENT. Daily Drills and Reports to ensure progress. Frequency is the key to long term memory. MONITOR FIRE GROUND FOR IMPROVEMENTS

*  FAILURE TO COMPLY WITH NEW TRAINING SCHEDULE WILL RESULT IN REPRIMAND or PROGRESSIVE DICSIPLINE/Written Reprimand if this known violation of SOP is a reoccurring PROBLEM.

*  INFORM SUBORDINATES on THEIR DUE PROCESS and THEIR RIGHT TO APPEAL any decision. E.P.A.

*  WRITTEN REPORTS TRACK PROGRESS  AND to keep the CHIEF INFORMED.

*  Provide RECOMMENDATIONS to Chief for future actions.

TO SUMMARIZE AND REVIEW MY PROGRAMS

I  USED TARGET HAZARD DRILLS AND REPORTS ALONG WITH Training in Context TO TRAIN, MANAGE, DISCIPLINE MY BATTALION AND ALONG WITH THE SAFETY COMMITTEE EVALUATED AND TRACKED OUR PROGRESS LOOKING FORWARD TO THE FUTURE WHILE LEARNING FROM THE PAST.

I USED EXCEPTION PRINCIPLES TO DELEGATE AUTHORITY SO THAT DECISIONS WERE HANDLED ACCORDING BY USING TIMELINES AND SCHEDULES BY USING SUBORDINATES OF THE ORGANIZATION WHILE RETAINING THE ABILITY FOR THOSE LOWER LEVELS TO TO ASK FOR HELP ON THE EXCEPTIONS FROM THEIR SUPERVISORS ALL THE WAY UP THE CHAIN OF COMMAND.

*  I ADDRESSED THE LEADERSHIP &amp; COMMITMENT OF THE BC’S.
*  I FRAMED THE PROBLEMS &amp; CHALLENGES  OF BC6 TRAINING BROUGHT  THE BATTALION UP TO SPEED.
*  I DEVELOPED GOALS, MODELS AND ALTERNATIVES BASED ON SUCCESSFUL ROLE MODELING.
*  I COLLECTED VALUED INFORMATION AND DOCUMENTED PROGRESS.
*  I ACCESED THE NEEDS ANALYSIS  &amp; PROPOSED SOLUTIONS.
*  I RECRUITED THE NECESSARY  RESOURCES.
*  I DEVISED AND IMPLEMENTED A  PLAN AND PUT IT IN WRITING.
*  I  STARTED A TRAINING PROGRAM &amp; SAFETY COMMITTEE.
*  IT WILL BE MONITORED &amp; EVALUATED OVER TIME.

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